Tuesday, 26 June 2012

Sterntube bearing


Sterntube bearing
Sterntube bearing

 The sterntube bearing serves two important purposes. It supports the tailshaft and a considerable proportion of the propeller weight. It also acts as a gland to prevent the entry of sea water to the machinery space.

Early arrangements used bearing materials such as lignum vitae (a very dense form of timber) which were lubricated by sea water. Most modern designs use an oil lubrication arrangement for a white metal lined sterntube bearing. One arrangement is shown in Figure 11,4. 
Oil is pumped to the bush through external axial grooves and passes through holes on each side into internal axial passages. The oil leaves from the ends of the bush and circulates back to the pump and the cooler. One of two header tanks will provide a back pressure in the system and a period of oil supply in the event of pump failure. A low-level alarm will be fitted to each header tank.
Oil pressure in the lubrication system is higher than the static sea water head to ensure that sea water cannot enter the sterntube in the event of seal failure.

2 comments:

  1. Good point on spinning the bearings after oiling them! I did that, but I forgot to mention that into the blog. I might make an edit. white metal bearings

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  2. I'm really excited in your design. I can't wait to build it. white metal bearings

    ReplyDelete